Archive for November, 2016

ASASSN-16ma declining?

November 11, 2016

Poor weather prevented any observations last night but tonight the sky cleared after a late afternoon storm and I estimated the nova at magnitude 6.3.

asassn-16manov11

So, it’s been gradually declining for 3 days, but whether that continues remains to be seen.

ASASSN-16ma update

November 9, 2016

As mentioned in yesterday’s updated post (with finder chart), conditions last night were less than ideal, but when the clouds cleared enough, I estimated the nova’s magnitude at 6.1.

asassn-16manov10

 

ASASSN-16ma: easy binocular object

November 8, 2016

Last night’s observation of ASASSN-16ma was with 7×50 binoculars rather than my Meade LX-90 8″ SCT. The nova is now on the verge of naked eye visibility!

asassn-16ma

I estimated the nova at magnitude 5.5 last night with one before mine at 5.4 and two subsequent observations of 5.8 and another at 5.9. Mine are highlighted in purple as usual.

Here’s the section of Sagittarius of interest as it currently appears from Adelaide, low in the south-western sky at around 9pm:

sgr

The nova is just west of the circled star HIP 90012, the 6.2 (labeled 62) magnitude star near the middle of this AAVSO finder chart:

x16923acn

If you rotate this chart 90 degrees to the right, it will have roughly the same orientation as the Stellarium sky scene.

Alnasl is the star labeled 30 (magnitude 3.0) at bottom right of the finder chart. Kaus Media corresponds to the label 27 and Kaus Borealis with the star labeled 28. Kaus Australis and Φ Sagittarii do not appear on the finder chart, but would be off to the left of the unrotated chart.

As I write this, the sky here in Adelaide is quite overcast, so there may be no observation from me tonight.

 

Update on two novae in Sagittarius

November 7, 2016

Poor weather then being away for work for three days last week has kept me away from variable star observing since October 29. Last night (November 6) I observed TCP J18102829-2729590 and ASASSN-16ma again.

While the first is on the decline currently (around magnitude 9):

tcp-j18102829-2729590-lc-nov-7

On the other hand, I caught ASASSN-16ma on the rise. My October 29 observation gave a visual magnitude of 10.3 whereas last night it was 7.3. Several hours later others were recording it at around 6.5:

asassn-16manov-7

So, ASASSN-16ma has exceeded TCP J18102829-2729590’s maximum (so far) by around one magnitude. If this rate of increase continues, who knows, maybe it will reach naked eye visibility. Here’s hoping!